New biotechnology may bring about materials we've never seen before.

The future is moving towards “growing” rather than manufacturing materials. Such changes could force us to rethink our relationship with our products. They also ask us to reconsider how our materials exist in and interact with our living environment.


Fabrics from new sources

Cultured silk, Bolt Threads

Bolt Threads is using yeast to produce proteins found in nature, such as spider silks, for fabrics that are stronger and stretchier than other fibers. LEARN MORE

Bolt Threads

Bolt Threads


BIOCOuTURE, Suzanne lee

Fashion designer Suzanne Lee has grown clothes rather than stitching them. She uses the bacteria and yeast culture that makes the healthy drink kombucha. This practice has been so popular that some DIYers have taken to growing leather-like kombucha skins in their bathtubs. LEARN MORE

Suzanne Lee

Suzanne Lee


Home products made from
living sources

CHITOSAN BIOPLASTIC, Wyss Institute

Researchers at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have introduced a new bioplastic isolated from shrimp shells. The plastic is made from chitosan, a form of chitin, which is the second-most abundant organic material on Earth. LEARN MORE

Wyss Institute

Wyss Institute


Grow Your Own Ink, La Paillasse

A group of DIYers created biological ink using purple soil bacteria. Their goal is to replace chemically made ink with ink that grows in living organisms. One day, the creators speculate, pens may even grow their own ink, melding one of our oldest technologies—writing—to one of our newest—biotech. LEARN MORE

La Paillasse/Marie Sarah-Adenis

La Paillasse/Marie Sarah-Adenis


Self-sustaining building materials

SELF-HEALING CONCRETE, HENK JONKERS, TU DELFT

Researchers from Delft Technical University in the Netherlands have developed concrete that can heal itself with bacteria. Jonkers added colonies of Bacillus bacteria to the concrete, which remains dormant until exposed to rainwater. Once a crack forms, the bacteria releases a hard substance, calcium lactate (a compound also found in milk) to seal the gap and prevent further cracking. LEARN MORE

Henk Jonkers

Henk Jonkers

 

Banner image: Marie Sarah-Adenis, La Paillasse, Grow Your Own Ink.